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governance project, which challenges philadelphia sovereignty. and then we'll move to action and look at the actual activities. fourth, will examine the significance of this conflict between constitutional government and global governance. sovereignty is defending the scholars scholars than most people as westphalian, embodied in the nation state is going the treaty of 1648 and that's true to an extent. when i was working on the book and thinking of coming up with concepts, i relist americans don't think of themselves as westphalian sovereignty. we the people of the united states of america. opening words of the constitution, written in philadelphia, hence philadelphia sovereignty. but what is philadelphia sovereignty, the people are sovereign, the three constitution and the core of the twin pillars of our liberty and consent. so we do have majority rule, but majority rule is limited reconstitution and the whole system of separation of powers, federalism and limited government. a lot of times people get hung up in the republic or democracy. wary compound machine, a regime that is both
nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment begins "congress shall enact no law." so it was addressed only to the national government. >> host: were there restrictions by different states on religion? >> guest: oh, yes, there were. several states had religious establishments. most states limited the amount of property a religious organization could own. some taxed religious property. others banned given groups' practices. i'm thinking, for example, eventually various states in the southwest banning polygamy, for example. >> host: so when it came to massachusetts, talk abou
in government. and over the last few years we have worked really hard to improve that park user's experience through the use of technology. and i want to start out before we talk a little about the app saying a if you thank yous. i really want to thank mayor lee to his incredible commitment to technology and frankly the recreation and park department. i want to thank supervisor chiu who has been a leader both in the parks world and in the technology world. sf city has really been a driving force behind helping government think about new ways, new and improved ways maybe for some of you they're old ways now. but new and improved ways for government to reach users of our programs and services. and i want to say the last special thank you to the folks from apple-liscious. this thing is awesome. this past year, the trust for public land which is a national parks organization determined that san francisco, which has 4,000 acres of open space and over 220 parks, over 15% of the city's land is open space. the trust for public land said we have the best urban park system in america. and the challeng
opposite is happening to our government. it is gone crazy with regulation and restriction, but the part that is most alarmming is the amount of money that we are print one day will explode. we can't continue to print money. we have fancy names for it. it is quantitative easing and it is really printing money. wrim bay way has a trillion dollar note and you buy a loaf of bread everybody is happily singing . we will pick up the bill for the health care. new taxes kicked n and they went to the bar and restaurant had a great time and now they will get a check for the so-called health care. >> that is good bread for a trillion dollars. we will ask the congressman worked with bill clinton a democrat and now working with barack obama a democrat. go to my website tell me what you think on the leaf feed back . sign up for my facebook and follow me on twitter. you can find the link to that and more at nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by usin
majority in the house. that is a governing majority. he's going to have it on immigration and also on the debt ceiling. not sure he's going to have it on guns, but he's going to drive the really hard-line republicans crazy because he's going to be able to break off 40 or 50 of them for all these other things. chris: that seems to be true as much as the opposition is hotter and perhaps hardening out there on the right. it does seem that the center right and the center are in play and obama is making his move toward them successfully. >> their governing philosophy coming in is that the fever would break among the tea party folks, among the hard right, and also that just folks in the house would sort of move to the boehner philosophy, which is a governing philosophy. the sort of -- chris: in other words, you don't need a majority of the republicans to rule. >> you break the rule, which is what he's done on these big-ticket items. they have been meeting over these last couple of days to figure out wait forward. i think the president was smart to step into these debates early and often
's the author of this book, "the spirit of compromise: why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it." president gutmann, are we a politically compromised? >> guest: we were created in compromise. a lot of people think of the revolutionary war, which separated us from our mother country. but if you recall -- i know you weren't there then, but if you recall historically speaking our founding fathers crafted a compromise that created the constitution. they were as polarized as any set of americans have been throughout our country and our history. they were pro-and anti-slavery and the compromise. so yes, we were founded in compromise, that today compromises become more difficult than ever before. >> host: what do you mean when you talk about the uncompromising mindset? >> guest: we live in an era characterized as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and th
of government. a set of principles emerged that there is not universal agreement on, but overwhelming consensus and they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you'll permit and another 10 to 12 minutes, i want to lay out what they are from the perspective of the president. the first foundational principle is there is a second amendment. the president and i support the second amendment that comes with the right of law-abiding responsible citizen to own guns, gives a further protection as well as recreation. the second foundational principle, certain people in society should not and legally can be disqualified from being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens that in fact the vast majority of gun owners comprise. three, we should make common sense judgment about keeping dangerous weapons off our streets. clearly within the purview of the government at the same time recognizing, honoring them being compliant with the second amendment. and for, this isn't just about guns. it is about the coursing of our culture. the coursing of our cult
of the individual and the power of the state. at the time that you're talking about in 1787, the government had muskets and individuals had muskets, there was a very close correlation between the power to use violence on both sides. the other thing that you have to take into account, this is something i haven't heard in this debate, and that is if you look basically to the middle of the 19th century, 1862, the winchester henry rifle, report on that rifle that i just cited in a recent paper showed that it fired 15 rounds in less than ten seconds. the fact of the matter is that repeating technology is 150 years old. and one of the worries here, i think, for people who are on the other side of this is that when we go through this bad gun analysis that there's not really a solid boundary between the current category of assault weapons, parcularly rifles, and any other gun that is out there. >> why ban machine guns then? >> machine guns were banned in 1934 as a result of the national firearms act. >> why not ban the ar-15? >> i think you can make a coherent distinks between semi-automatic firing and
and the government programs and medicare and we are going to have to go back and do this every couple of years but we have to study what works and put more of the policies that are working in place. we have to deal with our other entitlement. it's a contentious issue in this country. it's always a political tough battle. but the longer we wait to make the changes for the people the difference of the programs there is no question about that and we have to go forward with tax reform which is great when you talk about it broadly we all know the tax code is a disaster and none of us like the tax code. when you talk about the ability to broaden the base, lower the rate and raise revenue, that is a pretty good system. it's pretty desirable to think about how to reform the tax code. but there are a lot of tough things when you talk about the specifics and the fact we need to deal with the mortgage deduction for state and local taxation then capping the discretionary you don't have to talk about a single specific policy. taxing the 1% is easy even if you are the 1% its current take more of that to fix the pr
to gather dust on the shelf, of some agency, in government, a set of principles emerged, that there was not universal agreement on, but overall whelming consensus on, and they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you'll permit me about another 10-12 minutes, i want to lay out to you what they are from the perspective of the president and me. the first foundational principle is, there is a second amendment. the president and i support the second amendment. and it comes with the right of law-abiding, responsible citizens to own guns. use it for their protection as well as for recreation. the second foundational principle, certain people in society should not, and legally can be disqualified from, being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens that in fact the vast majority of gun owners x-ray. -- owners comprise. three, we should make commonsense judgments about keeping dangerous weapons off our streets. clearly within the purview of the government, at the same time recognizing, honoring, and being compliant wit
lowered their expectations -- there's always debate about what the proper role of government ought to be. i suspect it will have more of that in the coming days about what the proper role government should be -- what are our expectations? are they too low? some of my friends on the right will see the opposite -- the expectations of government are too high. talk to me about expectations -- what do we have a right to the world? >> i think it is important what they were saying about what should be done -- it is not theory, it is actually being done in countries around the world with demonstrated, proven results. every child in many countries in europe start out with that preschool. the results are that unlike this country, there is not hereditary poverty. it is proven -- this is not a theory. what you are saying about the health system is completely proven. our health system costs an extra $750 billion a year for exactly the same services that you would get in other countries. at the institute of medicine issued a report that the waste and fraud that comes from this for-profit system is 5%
, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immigration reform, bank regulations, and so on down the list. it was a progressive case, but it wasn't necessarily a big government case. saying there's a mix of -- >> let's talk about some examples. i think you know them. the right wing ideas of rights is leave me alone, i got enough guns here in this house to hold you off for a couple days anyway if the government comes in with helicopters. progressives' idea of rights is a couple young people would like to go to the university of mississippi. it took the federal troops to go in there to get them in the door. a governor named george wallace tried to stop people at the door at the university of alabama, they had to be pushed aside. that's an aggressive communitarian notio
these people -- caller: all these people who are paranoid to think the government is going to take their guns, they probably use a psychological evaluation. if the government wants to take your guns and your assault weapon isn't going to stop them from doing that. a second opinion is, i hear everyone talk about regulating and background checks on handguns, but what about background checks on ammunition and that would cut back criminals. host: i appreciate your time. mental health issue must be handled very carefully. a counselor and nurse should be on every public school site, not guns. and joseph asked, should ptsd prevent owning a firearm. rick on our republican line. what are your thoughts? caller: i appreciate you taking my call. i am a republican, i'm a gun owner, former n.r.a. member and i'm also treated for depression. host: why a former n.r.a. member? caller: the day after the presidential election, i was contacted by the n.r.a. -- if you know anything about the n.r.a., if you are a member, they do contact you quite often, mail, via phone calls, asking for money. and more money. and w
with the cash. the guard does not go down easily. >> i heard at least 15 to 18 shots. >> tonight, governments in the manhunt for the brinks bandits. i'm bill hemmer in tonight for shepard smith. one of the american hostage in algeria is dead. u.s. officials saying that he was from texas they have recovered his remains and november his family. sources tell fox news he died of a heart attack yesterday when algerian forces stormed the gas plant and tried to rescue the hostage. a bit earlier today the militants claim they were holding two americans at the facility in the sahara. and the state department confirming there were other u.s. hostage there. no word though tonight on their fate. the militants were also offering to swap two americans for two convicted terrorists head here in the u.s. one of them the so-called blind sheikh convict haved of plotting to blow up landmarks here in new york city. investigators say he also has ties to the first world trade center bombing of 1993. "the fox report's" chief meteorologist jonathan hunt tonight live on the story in our new york newsroom. jonathan, th
on the national mall through the association that governance the national mall. that's a bridge we'll cross when we come to it. but there are a number of civic-minded things to do if we are lucky to have access funds when it is all said and done. >> cnn. how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in the security on the day of the inauguration? and also, how large of an area will be closed off with street closures? >> first, to answer your question, we cannot go into detail as to how many law enforcement officers will be present for the inauguration. and could you repeat your second question for me? >> how many agencies? >> i can't go into detail. >> how much will be closed off. >> we have road closures in effect and i can provide you with information on those. >> [inaudible question] veragets with all events that happen on the capitol complex, we train constantly to address them. as far as specific threats, i can't answer that right now, but just know that united states capitol police with our law enforcement partners have trained constantly in regards to issues that may com
of some agency in government, a set of principles emerge that there was not universal agreement on, but overwhelming consensus on. they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you will permit me another 10-12 minutes, i want to lay out to you what they are from the perspective of the president the first foundational principles is there is a second amendment. -- from the perspective of the president and me. it comes with the right of law- abiding responsible citizens who own guns. the second foundational principles, certain people in society should not and can be disqualified from being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens but the vast majority of gun owners comprise. 3, we should make common sense judgments about keeping dangerous weapons off of our streets. clearly within the purview of the government, at the same time recognizing, honoring, and being compliant with the second amendment. four, this is not just about guns. it is about our culture. whether it is with video games, movies, or behavior. it is about the abil
: will america buy that we the people is now we the government. we will report. you will decide. >>brian: one guy i know does buy it. it looks like he'll have his media in the corner with the president of the united states. this network executive heard an article telling the president to pulverize and destroy republicans. you can go for their throats. we see him sunday with bob schieffer. we can't make this up. we'll review it only for you on "fox & friends." >>steve: it is the coldest day of the winter so far here in new york city. that is why it was a good decision to go indoors today. >>gretchen: you know even though i grew up in minnesota, i hate the cold weather. so let's pretend it is 90 degrees and go for it. >>brian: yesterday 600,000 people happy yesterday was a little warmer. it was at a minimum 800,000 shy from four years prior. the balls that followed, the parade that ensued. it's always a great day in america. >>gretchen: for me, beyonce. i see that you and i slept together again last night. >>brian: do you mean purple? >>gretchen: sure. let's do headlines. three americans were unfor
the government accountable to the people. few of us agree with everything that is done or spoken under protection of our first amendment rights, our freedom of the press. but as a son of vermont printers and publishers, you can bet that i have very serious concerns about the press being shut out. of course i oppose the disclosure of properly classified government information, but i think we have to make sure that legislative efforts to protect or prevent classified leaks don't ink fringe upon our fundamental freedoms, including the freedom of the press. and there i might say to the administration as i have said to past administrations, don't overclassify things. don't put a classification on everything that you do, including those things where you want to cover your mistakes. this is an open and free country. let's keep it that way. so i'll keep pushing to update our privacy laws, to address emerging technology and the internet, including the electronic communications privacy act. we have to re-authorize satellite, tv licenses. we have to make most accessible for those with visual disabilities. w
, expansive government." the chairwoman of the house republican conference said "the president's out word words must be matched with actions regarding the country's fiscal health," suggesting a gulf between the two." good morning, your thoughts on the inaugural address? caller: i thought that it was wonderful. i thought that the speech was very insightful. the keylieve that's words were we the people. together we will do all the things we set out to do. host: he talked about preserving medicare, social security. he talked about climate change, equal rights for gay couples and women. is that your priority list? caller: maybe not in that order, but the president has a hard job and congress has got to work together with him. i believe that we have good republicans. many people in the country believed in the position of the president and that the congress will go along, eventually. host: all right, douglas. your priority list? top five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on
. these are composed of experts on terrorism across government agencies and make recommendations to the deputies who assist the president's cabinet in formulating a response to crises involving terrorism. there was an attempt from the outset it seems by officials at the state department and elsewhere to downplay this as a terrorist attack against americans and it's not clear why, because these teams, and the fast team of marines from rota, spain were not sent to benghazi. as a result the f.b.i. could not enter the benghazi consulate for 24 days. that prevented them from doing crucial work on the ground in benghazi that would have helped them get to the bottom of who was responsible for this attack. >> reporter: what remaining questions do you have about the conclusions of the accountability review board, that is a committee headed by admiral mike mullen and former ambassador thomas pickering about mistakes made in benghazi. >> reporter: wong of the recommendone of the questions we have is they say they interviewed 100 witnesses and officials who were involved that night in the benghazi response, but
. sympathy about government employees, all of that stops if there is no deal in place. most market participants, most analysts, economists believe they will come up with something, but it is the deal that is in place that is questionable, whether you're a rating agency, whether you are investor, whether you're somebody will look at the paycheck which most americans this week got a pretty rough, eye-opening look at their check. i guess it was last week, when they saw the big cut in the social security payroll tax. it was a jump. you have less money now. so many things are affected unfortunately. coming into february, here we are again going to be with spending cuts going to kick in officially. all of this will affect unfortunately the markets. it will be a little rough. the economy is fragile. don't get a deal, jenna. you're looking at recession. fitch knows that. investors know that. we're watching it here at fox business. a little rough. jenna: all right. those are the stakes, recession or not. we'll watch this very closely over next couple weeks. cheryl, thank you. >> you bet. jo
the gravity of a u.s. government shutdown? does it not comprehend it's not merely the nation's credit rating that's at risk from the debt ceiling debacle? but the full faith and credit of the republic itself? how long can we shrug off this grand canyon plunge that's coming? as we did again with another benign day, dow tipped 29 points, and nasdaq advance advanced .22%. this is behavior. is the market actually smarter than you and i think? i'm starting to believe the latter and tonight i'm going to tell you why. first, i don't necessarily want to invest in a country if it doesn't pay its bills. dead beat country, but i don't mind if it can't pay for its bills but for a moment refuses to. it must honor its debts no matter what. i believe passionately that we will pay debts in a timely fashion. congress is supposed to hold the purse strings, but the american people are less stupid than washington thinks they are. they lived through another one of these scares. that time, we were frightened, frightened about what a ratings agency downgrade would mean to the country. do you remember where you wer
is, these groups operate in areas where there is no central government control. you're talking about countries such as libya that have gone through their revolutions, but in algeria, for instance, this is a huge portion of the sahara desert. you don't have local authority there. you don't have security forces there. these al qaeda militants are able to operate with impunity and make a lot of. with these criminal operations. >> to give the primmer on mali, for those who follow developments there, this has been an extraordinary year for that country. effectively. you'll have to correct me if i'm wrong here, effectively the northern part of mali is completely out of the control of what should be the central government and is effectively in control of al qaeda-associated militan militants? >> right. and why did the french come in now into mali? you might wonder why a country like france would send hundreds and soon thousands of ground troops to that country to try to battle islamist rebels when this is the kind of operation that could end up costing france quite a lot, not just in terms
, there are international governing bodies or international authorities that said over them and the efforts are attempting to expand the population of countries that participate. generally, we see participation of more countries. host: looking at fourth graders, we see reading and math skills has improved and science has improvedun changed. guest: this particular grab it does not show everything. if we look across the entire distribution, we still lowest performing u.s. students with scores that have improved over time. there is a story of improvement among the subjects. this is something we also see in our national assessments. in the u.s., we have seen in mathematics and elsewhere, improvements for our younger students. host:tom lovelss, when you see these numbers, what does it tell you? guest: they bounce around from administration to administration. i think it is wise to take a longer view. i like to look at scores over a longer period of time like a decade or more. if you go back to 1995 and look at the fourth and eighth grade, the u.s. has made steady progress. i am encouraged by these scores. host:
. that is the reason. if the government had a list of who has guns, the belief is that if a tyrant or tyrannical rule of law makers takes over, they know who to go for to take away guns. that is to take away freedom. it is a longstanding belief. this is also what informed people, touching on the immigration issue, people who did not want to have a national id card, something that will weed out illegal immigrants if you have an id card, a lot of people believe that that is an infringement of rights as well. the have centralized lists, that is one libertarian and other people began to get worried about government power. i believe the instant background checks, there are rules about how long the government to keep the intermission of who applied for a gun permit -- who has been able to purchase any firearm under that were so great about the government having the list that are required to get rid of the ever mission or dispose of it within a time. . -- within a time period. host: lloyd is joining us from pennsylvania on the republican line. caller: there are two items i want to try to do quickly. why is
libyans were amazed at the site of a senior government official doing mundane activities without a huge entourage and demanding vip treatment. chris had a great knowledge of libyan history and culture. he would often crack jokes with government counter parts. not just in arabic but in the libyan dialect, which the libyans loved to hear him speak. another told me when i saw him in may as newly appointed ambassador in tripoli he had not changed, despite the promotion and accolades. he was the same guy. lingering one night after dinner to help me with a difficult table, i referred to him as sir or ambassador. he looked at me for a second, he sighs and he said i wish everyone would just call me chris. he loved the work, loved the people, but he never took himself too seriously. people talk about what a good diplomat he was. he knew how to motivate others to be the same. even those down on their careers, lost faith, in hardship. this was a tough task to inspire other to serve with dignity and self-respect. chris knew how to do that. nothing we can say here can make up for the heart ache and
they do that? are there checks and balances? >> the government and the private companies are blaming each other. venezuela is pointing fingers everywhere. we have the government that is blaming the private companies of hoarding the products to destabilize the country and possibly provoke a coup because of what is happening. >> a coup? >> yes. but then we have the private companies in the position that are blaming the government for not providing a stable capital control and limiting the dollars to venezuelans and other companies so they could purchase out of venezuela. >> is this nationwide? is this just caracas? >> it is mostly happening in caracas, but it is also throughout the whole country. it has a lot to do with inflation. but also there is something we have to talk about which is the price regulation that the government created last year. let me show you an example. talk about milk production. milk producers, they can only receive 3.6, equal to 84 cents, where leader once selling their milk. however, the cost of production, it is 4.13. which is 96 cents. so on average milk producer
activity and snatch those illegal guns off the streets of america. somehow the government is going to do something that causes everyone to be armed, that we are marching down the street, coming after guns, is a whole lot of nonsense. the people who are not dealing in the reality of what i and achieve and what many other states on a daily basis. we have real jobs, with real responsibilities, trying to make folks say. -- our folks say. we need to have a serious conversation about these issues. thank you. >> thank you very much, mayor. [applause] our next group, we asked people try to hear, the first is ms. barbara lee from california. when you are responding to this group, if you would like to comment on the earlier questions, please feel free. >> thank you. my heartfelt condolences go to the families of your loved ones and to the entire newtown community. i am from oakland california. our thoughts and prayers are to you. 15 of my constituents were shot last week. could you please give us an idea of what cities and police officers and mares confront in terms of daily gun violence? >> i wan
, the call to reform or eliminate inefficient or irrelevant government programs.a that is a common and often ignored presidential refrain but scott, unavoidable budget new pressures may create new results., >> pelley: major, thank you very a co we don't know a correspondent who's covered more inaugurationsffer, ou than bob schieffer, our chief wa washington correspondent and anchor of "face the nation." bob, how do you assess the day?inaugurati >> well, it was a very unusual inauguration speech, scott, in that there were no real memorable lines. there was no "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself." there was no "ask not what your country can do for you" as jack kennedy did. this was more like a state of the union speech where the president listed his priorities. he did not particularly ask for help. rather he said we're all in this together and we won't solve it unless we are i think the left will like it a lot. the people on the right not so mu much. having said all of that, it wass a perfect day.utiful w it was a beautiful weather, the crowds were large, they
of the area's conservative tide. >> in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. >> but the most recent inaugural address was that given by barack obama. >> this is the price and the promise of citizen ship. this is the source of our confidence, the knowledge that god calls on us to shape and uncertain destiny. this is the meaning of our liberty and our creed, why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent mall, and why a man whose father who less than 60 years ago might not have been served in a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath. >> wow. at its best, inaugural justice for a presidency, what a lead sentence does for a book. it captures the duration of what's to come. a great presidency often begins with a great statement. in the day that make that statement is within moments of taking the oath itself. jon meacham is the author of "thomas jefferson: the art of power" way up on the new york times best sellers list and he joins me now. i'm here
americans consider to be out of control government spending. chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel is live for us on the hill tonight. mike, what do key republicans think of president obama's attitude toward congress? >> well, harris, they do not like the fact that the president is transitioning his campaign to a new purpose for the second term, they feel like that's a bad sign. they lost do not like it when president obama goes around the united states congress, bottom line, missouri senator roy blunt is saying the time for president obama to be more realistic. >> he speaks in general terms, he likes the executive order approach a whole lot better than the legislative approach and you really can't get all that more with the executive orders, you've he got to legislate and realistically, you don't control the entire congress. >> and blunt says with divided congress with republicans controlling the house, that requires compromise and he says there is an opportunity if there's proper leadership to get some big things done, harris. >> harris: you know, from outside washington it's pre
the money? sources tell abc news, the federal government is likely to join a whistle-blower lawsuit against armstrong this week, seeking to recoup millions of dollars paid to sponsor his cycling teams. it would be the costliest case against lance armstrong by far. and his biggest headache going forward. this morning, sources say the lying is over. after a decade of denials -- >> i have never doped. >> reporter: -- even lawsuits, and vicious attacks against his detractors -- >> i've never taken performance-enhancing drugs. >> reporter: -- sources tell abc news that lance armstrong now admits he really was on more than just his bike. and this morning, oprah's revealing new details about her interview. >> yes, think the entire interview was difficult. i would say he did not come clean in the manner that i expected. >> reporter: armstrong is in talks to possibly repay some of the millions of dollars the u.s. postal service paid to sponsor his team. money the federal government is already considering suing to get back. betsy and her husband, frankie, were close armstrong friends for years before
? >> that is government numbers used by republican members of the senate budget committee. it represents a whole new america. in fact, it represents a total reversal from the days of welfare reform in the mid-1990's. welfare has made an enormous come-back. there are no plans to rein it in. it is going to go up by $11 trillion. spending on welfare up $11 trillion in the next ten years. that's astronomical. >>steve: is a portion of it a sign of the times because the economy is so bad and it is hard for people to find work and they need assistance? >> absolutely not. there has been a shift in the eligibility for welfare during the obama years. more people are getting heating assistance, cell phones. you name it, you can get more of it in the obama years. point is there is no plan to rein this in. the president is adamantly opposed to any spending cuts or any reining in of these run-away programs. >>gretchen: one in six americans now on food stamps. i think one in four children, i've heard, are on food stamps. >> 19.9 million children are fed by the federal government. >>gretchen: you know what comes to
algerian workers escaped. as many as 41 workers were seized. algeria's government were in talks overnight about whether international forces could help against the militants. >>> when we come back, find out if your employer made the cut of the best employers to work for. before that, take a look at yesterday's winners and losers. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. i have low testosterone. there, i said it. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with a
if the scandal implicating top cycling officials inside the international cycling union, the sports' governing body. more on armstrong's latest trouble in a live report from austin, texas. >>> to another developing story this morning in north africa, in algeria, where the fate of several americans remains unknown. they were taken hostage yesterday during an attack by islamic militants. happened at a gas field owned partly by bp. two people have been killed, and there are reports this morning that some of those hostages have escaped. defense secretary leanne pa net leon panetta not mincing words. >> by all indication this is is a terrorist act and the united states strongly condemns these kinds of terrorist acts. it is a very serious matter when americans are taken hostage along with others. >> cnn's dan rivers is in london. dan, there are so many different stories going around that the compound was attacked by the algerian military, that some of the hostages escaped, including one american. what are you hearing? >> well, i'm afraid it is a very confusing picture. the latest line we have from t
in government spending which they want. he said trimming the budget deficit should be a different discussion separate from the debt ceiling. >> raising the debt ceiling does not authorize us to spend more. all it does is say that america will pay its bills, and we are not a deadbeat nation. >> clearly house speaker john boehner thinks differently. he responded by saying, quote, the american people do not support raising the debt ceiling without reducing government spending at the same time. >>> these pens are designed to be used only by one person, but an investigation discovered that many of them were used on multiple people. >>> are you in hawaii or going there anytime soon? surfers, beware. check out this video. it's a real-life jauss. two sharks were swimming dangerously close to the show. can you believe it? look at that. you could wade in and be bitten, eaten. last year there were a total of 11 shark attacks in hawaii. >> that's what i call dangerously close. >> oh, my goodness. >> so some people in the southeast waking up to the dual danger of flooding and ice. alexandra steele in the
inalienable rights that no man our government can take away from us. we have also long recognized, as our founders recognized, that with rights, responsibilities. along with our freedom to live our lives as we will, comes an obligation for others to do the same. we don't live in isolation. we live in a society. a government by and for end of the people. we are responsible for each other. the right to worship freely and safely, that right was denied to sikhs, in oak creek, wisconsin. the right to assemble peaceably, that right was denied shoppers in oregon and moviegoers in aurora, colorado. the most fundamental set of rights to life and liberty and pursuit of happiness, fundamental rights that were denied to college students at virginia tech and high-school students at columbine and elementary school students in newtown and kids on street corners in chicago on too frequent basis to tolerate. all of families who have never imagined that they would lose a loved one to a bullet -- those rights are at stake. we are responsible. when i visited new town last month, i spent some private time wit
? >> i'd give it a seven. i think you heard a strong defense of the role of government. it was actually the full circle reagan maligned government, clinton triangulated, obama laid out a vision for america. >> i want to get an average. >> i think seven. >> where were you? >> eight. howard? >> i want to top joy so 8.1. >> michael -- >> i will top all of you, it was nine inching to ten. >> i thought it was totally nonpartisan so it averages out to two. and i thought that when he talked about people who really are skeptical about government, the tea party people, he reached out to them and said some people have sort of a reasonable skepticism about what government can do. he was even nonpartisan with regard to tehran which -- >> i have to disagree. i think he did very little reaching out. >> very little. >> what he said was, look, i honor the tradition of individualism in america, and we have a yin and yang thing in this country that will go on forever. but he also said at this moment, at this time we need to stress one side of that equation. i think he used the line, we could go on with t
been killed in u.s. drone strike inside yemen. yemeni government says the attack of four militants but the claim has not been independently verified. the attack comes one day after those of anger of the drone attacks blocked a main road linking the targeted town with the capital. the obama administration meanwhile reportedly has decided to exclude cia drone strikes in pakistan from new legal oversight for targeted killings overseas. the washington post reports counter-terrorism adviser and cia-nominee john brennan has signed off on a plan to exempt the drone attacks in pakistan from a list of operations that would be covered under newly enacted rules. areas covered in the so-called play book include the process for adding names to kill lists, the principles for killing u.s. citizens abroad, and the command chain for authorizing cia or u.s. military strikes outside war zones. the exemption of drone strikes in pakistan would allow the cia to continue carrying them without -- tearing them without a legal framework for a to two years. the hostage standoff in a jury of his ended in the
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